Amber Case

Amber Case is a National Geographic Emerging Explorer and director of the Research and Development Center at the Ecosystems Research Institute (ESRI) in Portland, Oregon. As the daughter of two broadcast engineers, Case learned early on how to engage her passions in science, math, and science. Engineering. While studying at Lewis & Clark College, he hooked her up Engineering Study experience in Sociology And Anthropology. This convergence grew out of an interest in understanding the symbiotic nature of humans TechnologyIt began its career in Cyborg Anthropology.

As a cyborg anthropologist, Case studies the interface between humans and humans Technology How those interactions affect people and Culture more time. A cyborg is an organism to which external elements have been added so that it can better adapt to changing conditions. According to Case, human interaction TechnologyEspecially interactive devices like computers, tablets and cell phones make us all cyborgs. Anthropology Origin, Development and Science Culture of humans. Cultures They are largely shaped by the tools and technologies they create. Throughout human history, tools have been important extensions of the physical self, and now, anthropologists like Case believe that tools are extensions of the mental self.

As a result, humans can connect more easily and quickly than ever before. Social networks, online gaming, and virtual interfaces are some examples of tools used to extend the mental self. Case trusts these men-Technology Mutual connections amplify humanity because they allow people to overcome geographic and social barriers that would otherwise prevent them from connecting with each other. A practical application of Case’s work on the cyborg Anthropology Geology, the location-sharing company he co-founded. The geological structure works well to integrate Technology In real life by providing location based information in real time.

Through his ongoing research, Case continues to uphold the philosophy of computer pioneer Mark Weiser, who said, “The better Technology To be invisible, to get out of your way and let you live your life.”

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Transcript (English)

– So as a child, after dinner, my father and I would talk, and one day we would pick up a piece of paper and ask, „What is the shortest distance between two points?” I said, „That’s a straight line,” and you told me that yesterday. And he said, „Well, no, there’s still less distance between point A and point B.” He draws point A and point B on a piece of paper and folds the paper together so that point A and point B touch. And he said, „The shortest distance between two points.” When I went to college and started studying anthropology and sociology, I was writing my thesis on cell phones and researching everyone talking on cell phones. Everyone realized that point A and the person they were calling was point B. And if they pick up that phone and press the button to call that person, it’s this instant wormhole that compresses space and time and is point A and point B. I See How Technology Affects Culture Over Time For too long our online personas have been extensions of our physical selves, and our tools have been extensions of our minds, so says an anthropologist. „Well, how does this actually affect people? „What are we going to see in the future? „And there are risks and chances that you’ll be using an „interesting device” for „longer than a year. Your pocket?” So I come from an engineering family. Both my parents are broadcast engineers. They broadcast television, put on commercial breaks. My dad invented things in his spare time. And I grew up with computers as a pet. Instead of someone having a dog, I had a computer. So for all intents and purposes, I was doing math and science, I was programming, and I thought, „Yeah, I’ll be an engineer.” And finding a way to educate people is really important to me so I can create better technology for them. So I discovered in college that there was a department called anthropology that studied people. And then there’s a field called cyborg anthropology, where you study people’s interactions with technology. That married with my background in engineering and math and science, because all of a sudden I could not only build technology, but I could build an interface where people could actually interact with it. By using technology I can fundamentally change how things work or reduce friction and irritation in everyday life. Something I’ve recently experimented with is what I call the invisible interface. Basically an invisible button, also known as a Geofence. You can place this fence on a map and it will be completely invisible. When your phone enters the fence, something happens. In this case, when I go home, my phone knows I’m home. It automatically tells the lights in the house to turn on, and when I leave the lights turn off. Hello, my name is Amber Case. I am a cyborg anthropologist and a National Geographic Explorer.

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Transcription (Spanish)

– There was a time when, after dinner as a child, my father and I stayed to chat, and one day he took out a piece of paper and asked, „What is the shortest distance between two points?” I said, „That’s a straight line, you told me yesterday.” And he said, „Well, no, there’s still less distance between point A and point B.” He also drew point A and point B on a piece of paper and folded the paper so that point A and point B touch. And he said, „It is the shortest distance between two points.” When I went to college and started studying anthropology and sociology,​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ and and I was writing my thesis on a cell phone, I was looking at all these people talking on their cell phones, and I realized that they were all Point A and the person they were calling. Point B. If you pick up that phone and press the button to call that person, it’s this instantaneous wormhole that compresses space and time and point A and point B are one. I look at how technology affects culture over time. We basically carry bigger devices inside our bags than outside. We store memories outside of ourselves. People interact with our characters online when we’re not around. For a long time, our tools stretched us physically, and now, our tools stretch us mentally as well. So an anthropologist looks back and says, „Well, how is that really affecting people? What are we going to see in the future? And are there risks and opportunities associated with that in the long term?” Have you been using an interesting device in your pocket for a year?” I come from a family of engineers. My parents were broadcast engineers. They broadcast television, inserted commercial breaks. My dad invented things in his spare time. And I grew up with computers like a pet. I was basically a I had a computer instead, and I was doing math and science, and I thought, 'Yeah, I’m going to be an engineer.’ I discovered in college that there was a field called anthropology where you could study the interaction of people with technology. It was perfect with my background in engineering, math and science, because suddenly I could create an interface that people could actually interact with. . Using technology can change how things work in everyday life or reduce friction and hassle. What I’ve been experiencing most recently is what I call the invisible interface. Basically an invisible button, also known as a Geofence. You can place this fence on a map and it will be completely invisible. When your phone enters the fence, something happens. In this case, when I get home, my phone knows I’m home. It automatically turns on the lights in the house and when I leave, the lights turn off. Hello, my name is Amber Case. I am a cyborg anthropologist and National Geographic Explorer.

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