Amy Dowden has been flooded with messages of support after making a surprise appearance in Strictly’s new trailer amid her breast cancer battle



Despite not being able to take part in this year’s series as a dancer, fans are in awe of Nila after she appeared alongside Strictly professional Amy Dow in the Strictly teaser trailer on Saturday.

The 33-year-old Welsh dancer began her chemotherapy treatment in August after being diagnosed with breast cancer earlier this year.

However, the star felt the support of her strict family every step of the way and was flooded with messages from fans after appearing in the trailer.

The series is set to launch on September 23, and the BBC released a glossy, dramatic clip on Saturday in anticipation of the latest line-up.

Amy appears early in the clip and briefly dazzles in a gorgeous shiny black two-piece and gold glitter eyeshadow before mysteriously disappearing into the night.

Strictly family: Amy Dowden, 33, makes a surprise appearance in Saturday’s new teaser trailer for Strictly after her breast cancer battle.
Brief Look: Amy appears at the very beginning of the clip in a gorgeous shiny black two-piece and gold shimmery eye shadow.

As the music draws to a climax, she exits and the other strictly professional dancers shine in gold as they dance together in the moonlight.

Fans left comments wishing Amy well and loving her upcoming treatments.

One wrote: 'Bless you, Amy’, while another wrote: '@amy_dowden We will miss you this year. Sending you lots of wishes xx.’

A third added: '@amy_dowden you will be missed this year Amy but keep fighting I’m sure we’ll all definitely see you dancing next year.’

Amy was diagnosed with breast cancer in May, and in July doctors discovered she had 'another type of cancer’ after an MRI revealed more tumors in her body.

Speaking about the news at the time, Amy said: 'For me, my journey, everything has changed. I am first going to have a lumpectomy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy.

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But then, after my MRI, they found another lump, so it turned out to be a mastectomy, and then, after my mastectomy, unfortunately, they found more lumps.

And my pathology was not what they expected, they found another type of cancer and then told me I needed chemo – that was a huge blow to me.

Strong: The Welsh dancer began her chemotherapy treatment in August after being diagnosed with breast cancer earlier this year.
Gratitude: Earlier this week, Amy joined her fellow experts in training
The message: 'So thankful for my @bbcstrictly family, yesterday was all I needed for today. I feel part of the whole journey so far!’
Balls: The dancer was inspired to tackle her latest cancer treatment after joining her fellow specialists in training on Tuesday (pictured together in July)
Fighter: Amy later took to her Stories to share a picture of herself during chemotherapy: 'Let’s go! Number three! Next cycle I mean half way through!’

’It wasn’t in the plan in the first place – and I know a plan you can’t fix.

„Then all of a sudden I realized, you’re scared, but the oncologist said I had a good chance of being cured with chemo.

’I was so scared, I didn’t want to do chemo, but seeing someone like you[Erin]for me that’s my dance, and it’s like, you can take my chest but you can’t take me. Dancing away from me, that’s why I’m so sad.

Earlier this week, Amy joined her fellow experts in training as she shared a sexy photo of herself after being scolded by the show’s hair and makeup team.

The dancer expressed her delight at feeling 'Amy again’ and felt inspired to tackle her latest cancer treatment – which comes after she was hospitalized with sepsis after her first round.

He wrote: 'So thankful for my @bbcsystrically family, yesterday was all I needed before today. I felt a part of the whole journey so far!

’Watched all the group numbers and process through the videos, watched it again yesterday, wow even better! Yes, it’s hard not having them do what I love, but I’m proud to be a part of such a talented team.

’I loved looking glamorous with the hair and make-up team, wearing a glittery dress from the wardrobe and feeling like Amy was back in my favorite place! Very grateful!’

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What is breast cancer, how many people does it affect and what are the symptoms?

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. There are more than 55,000 new cases in the UK each year, and the disease claims the lives of 11,500 women.

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer develops from a cancerous cell that forms in the lining of a duct or lobule in one of the breasts.

When breast cancer spreads to surrounding breast tissue it is called 'invasive’ breast cancer. Some people are diagnosed with 'carcinoma in situ’, where cancer cells have not grown beyond the duct or lobule.

Most cases develop in women over 50, but younger women are sometimes affected. Although it is rare, breast cancer can develop in men.

Staging refers to how big the cancer is and whether it has spread. Stage 1 is an early stage and stage 4 means the cancer has spread to another part of the body.

Cancer cells are graded from low, meaning slow-growing, to high, fast-growing. High-grade cancers are more likely to come back after they are first treated.

What causes breast cancer?

A cancerous tumor starts from an abnormal cell. The exact reason why a cell becomes cancerous is unclear. It is thought that something damages or changes certain genes in the cell. It makes the cell abnormal and proliferates.

There are certain risk factors that increase the chance of developing breast cancer, such as genetics.

What are the symptoms of breast cancer?

The usual first symptom is a painless lump in the breast, although most breast lumps are not cancerous and are fluid-filled cysts, which are benign.

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The first place breast cancer usually spreads is to the lymph nodes in the armpit. If this happens, you may develop a lump or lump in your armpit.

For more information visit Breastcancernow.org or call its free helpline on 0808 800 6000

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